Skip to main content

About your Search

20121226
20130103
STATION
KQED (PBS) 17
LANGUAGE
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the democrats. and there are folks who with political science looking at this who will say that latinos are really -- that republicans are leaving a lot of latino votes on the table because they're not participating in a comprehensive immigration reform, and i think that that's something that we're going to start to see change. yeah. >> and let me just add to that, too. you touched on it earlier, josh, this whole idea of the divide, the economic divide and the haves and the have-nots, and certainly, latino voters are part of the have-nots in many occasions. the occupy movement, which really got started in 2011, but really exploded in places like oak laerland earlier this year. what impact do you think that had on the national conversation? >> i think it enshrined a place in the national dialogue for issues like income disparity. i mean, the whole fiscal cliff situation is very much, look at the way that's being framed. 98% versus 2%. it's very close to the 99% that was the rallying cry of occupy, and the same thing with the argument over jobs versus austerity. are we going to go the way
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing directly with the sena
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opp
to abandon the project. >> this is science at his toughest into this video from the british and arctic survey shows that backbreaking effort by 12 scientists and engineers trying to drill through the ice. with bare hands on steel, the mission depended on hot water being blasted down into the ice to open the routes to an ancient lake. from a tiny camp on the ice, it was to explore at the limits of our eyes was possible. the goal was to drill down of two miles to reach the waters below. the drilling went wrong. it did not get deeper. but hot water leaked into the ice around. it was a major blow to a daring project. huge quantities of snow were malted, heated up, sterilized. this team just not work. >> the pace was slower than we had planned for. we did not have enough fuel to get to the service of the lake. we are extremely disappointed by that outcome. >> the drilling was not the only problem, just before christmas, a vital spare part had to be flown out all the way from britain. in the end, three years of planning and 8 million pounds have drawn a blank. they might try again. for now, the lak
's. he and his wife sylvia began program making in the 1950's. it was when he combined science- fiction with puppetry that he achieved his most famous creations. the pilot was commissioned for 321 our programs. -- 32 one hour programs. >> he said it was not day television series. and then he walked all the way up to me and said, this is a feature film. >> stingray was the first-ever british children's series to be filmed in color. >> anything can happen in the next half hour. >> capt. scarlet featured more realistic puppets and darker situations. this was the last of his series to be made with his puppet the technique. >> 20 kilometers away. >> one character remains closest to his heart. >> my favorite character was parker. >> he will be remembered as a man who entertained adults and children, using mechanical puppets, which still produce stories filled with emotion and excitement. >> matt zimmerman was the voice of allen tracy, the blond one. he played him, he did the voice. we spoke to him earlier and he told me more about his relationship with jerry anderson. >> he was an amazing man
look at a science story that captured headlines this year. the federal government has taken new steps to limit some of the research it does with chimpanzees, which have long been the source of hope and debate. but questions remain about whether those experiments should occur under any circumstances. "newshour" science correspondent miles o'brien reports. >> reporter: there are no other animals quite like them, except us. they share 99% of our d.n.a. and it shows. they scheme, plot and fight. they care for their babies and they grieve their dead. and they love a good game of catch. as i discovered, queenie had little patience for my wild pitches. >> did you see her stomp her foot? >> reporter: she's very mad at me. those very similarities are at the core of a heated debate over whether scientists should keep using chimpanzees for scientific and medical research. do we owe our cousins something more? here, they say we do. welcome to chimp haven, near shreveport louisiana, a 200-acre oasis of tall trees and hidden daily treats for about 130 chimpanzees. haven co-founder amy fultz put me
won the local science fair which was a first for... for students from west philadelphia high school. from there, it just organically grew. >> here, put it over here. the mission of the evx team this year is to be serious competitors in the automotive x prize. the automotive x prize is a $10 million competition that's invited teams from around the world to develop viable vehicles that get over 100 miles per gallon. we're the only high school in the world that has thrown our hat in the ring. >> to all the other teams in the x prize competition, you are going to lose. >> you know, we tell kids you can do anything, and as adults we know that there are limits. but we started to feed into it-- "yeah, we can do anything." what's the purpose of the progressive automotive x prize? yes? justin? >> to cause people to go into competition so that they can create something new and better for the environment. >> excellent. so, we're building two cars. the significant points are they use alternative fuels, they get over 100 miles a gallon, and high school students built them and they're being enter
sciences, engineering and art that has given birth to perhaps more game makers and changers than any other place in the real world and was the home of -- >> find the best in everybody. >> mike: professor randy palm whose last lecture became a phenomenon. it was a viral inspiration to millions but he was an inspiration to the smiths long before that. >> from the beginning of us starting this company he said "you guys really have something here. you have something unique. and keep developing that. keep making a-- make the best company you can possibly make and shoot for the stars." >> mike: shooting for the stars. they can do that. >> it will take you a long time to design a square head on this guy. >> yeah. >> mike: it's no secret that the new media-- both the internet and digital devices-- has taken a large bite out of the newspaper and magazine businesses. but there are some notable exceptions. we'll take you now to one company that is determined not to let the sun set on old media. it is doing more than just scratching for chicken feed in the media barnyard. it is planting the seeds of n
it as something complex. it's a little science fiction. for a second food -- imagine for a second that food will not be a need, a physiological need. what is your relationship with food then? because we really need to think then eating and breathing is the only two things from the moment we're born until the moment we die. so really it's a very complex relationship. >> you can tell the world about the complexity behind eating. >> ( translated ): yeah, you know, the people that are watching us right now, you know we can be telling them about the backstage, what happened behind, but i am only interested in happiness. when you see a painting, it's the emotion. why is it become something emotional. and why you will feel very emotional when you are in front of a gastro no, ma'am cal experience. this is something like only one can tell himself. it's people that when they are in front of a picasso painting they cry. you saw the people that they walk by and without even looking and it's the same painting. >> rose: and that's the way you have to approach food that individually it has to touch you as
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)